David Johnson

Among Canada’s Top 100

Dr, David JohnsonWhile most of us were spending the holiday season decorating our homes, visiting with family and friends and hoping for that special gift we had been hinting at for weeks, Dr. David Johnson received a different kind of holiday cheer. His latest book, Thinking Government: Public Administration and Politics in Canada was named as one of the Top 100 Best Political, Government, Public Policy and Canadian History Books in 2011, by The Hill Times this past December. “It is wonderful recognition for the book and for all the hard work that went into its writing,” said Johnson when asked about making the list. “It’s nice to know that the book is being read far and wide and that it is respected by students, other academics, and people working with governments and public services.”

Being a professor at CBU has been a great experience thus far for Dr. Johnson. A small department where everybody gets along, friendly faculty and the ability to get involved in collaborative research projects are just a few of the reasons he gets up with a smile on his face when coming to campus each day. “I love the small class sizes and the ability to really get to know my students.” He concludes that this results in a level of connection with the students that just isn’t attainable at larger universities. He also points out that “CBU’s small size gives students, faculty and staff the opportunity to get involved in more university wide activities.”

With his current book named as a Top 100 Best Political, Government, Public Policy and Canadian History Books in 2011 and two other books under his belt, Johnson has no intention of slowing down anytime soon. He is currently working on his next book with colleagues, and CBU faculty, Dr. Andrew Molloy and Dr. Tom Urbaniak, on the issue of intergenerational change and public service renewal within the Canadian Federal Government.

When he isn’t teaching about Canadian politics and government, Canadian public sector management, constitutional law and politics or issues in regional development, Dr. Johnson writes a political insight column for the Cape Breton Post. He is a member of the Old Sydney Society and enjoys reading, cooking and gardening at home.

Hailing from the big city, Dr. Johnson was born and raised in Toronto, Ont. In 1993, he was offered a position with CBU’s Political Science Department, which he happily accepted, and has been an honorary Cape Bretoner ever since.