CBU Art Gallery: New Exhibition to Open in October

Teresa Marshall: Red Rising Hoods
October 1, 2018 – January 11, 2019

Opening reception: Monday, October 1st, 2018, 3 – 6 pm
Artist’s talk: Tuesday, October 2nd, 2018, 2 – 4 pm

Drawing from popular and commodity culture, Teresa Marshall’s artistic practice uses familiar objects to address Aboriginal issues and to analyze relations of power. Through antagonism and humour, her artwork reveals and criticizes neo-colonialism as well as the impact of structural and systemic violence. In particular, she uses visual and verbal puns aimed at deconstructing stereotypes, challenging dominant worldviews. Marshall’s work urgently proposes alternative histories and truths in the twenty-first century.

The exhibition will present selections of the artist’s work produced over the years, including her most recent paintings and sculptures. Inspiration for new work has been drawn from the traditional regalia of Mi’kmaq women, especially peaked caps and garments.

An opening reception for the exhibition is scheduled for October 1st (3 – 6 pm) to coincide with Treaty Day. On Tuesday October 2nd (2 – 4 pm), the CBU Art Gallery will also host a public talk by Teresa Marshall. Both events are open to the public. Admission to the Gallery and events are always free.

Teresa Marshall is an award-winning multimedia artist who creates sculptures and installations that address the ellipses and absences in the dominant Eurocentric version of North American history. Marshall grew up in a bi-cultural military family, partially on the Millbrook reserve, before studying at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (BFA, 1990), where she won numerous scholarships and academic awards. Since the early 1990s Marshall has worked extensively as an instructor, juror, visiting artist and lecturer across Canada and the United States. Marshall is also a published poet and playwright who participates in a wide range of art-related activities that focus on issues faced by Native Peoples, with a specific concern for the wellbeing and celebration of the Mi’kmaq culture.

The CBU Art Gallery acknowledges the kind support of Arts Nova Scotia, Unama’ki College and the Indigenous Art Centre, Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada | Relations Couronne-Autochtones et Affaires du Nord Canada. The Gallery also extends its special thanks to Jeff Bear and Urban Rez Productions for their generosity in facilitating recording of the exhibition installation and related events.