Student Research Panel V


Join us as we celebrate student research on Tuesday, March 21 at 1:30pm until 3:00pm in CS  101.

This event is part of Research Month 2019. Visit our website for a full list of events.

Chair: Dr. Vicky Salazar

Speakers

Evaluating a Pilot Professional Development Course for Masters Coaches
Presenter:    Ciera Disipio (BACS SPAL); Supervisor:  Dr. Bettina Callary

CK 2 Alpha and Beta crystallization
Presenter:    Yanjun Dong (MBA in CED); Supervisor:  Dr. David Ruiz-Carrillo

Reflections by CBU Mi’kmaw students on using an indigenous methodology while teaming with non-Indigenous scholars on a speech pathology language research project
Presenters:    Susy Denny & Libby Alex; Supervisor:  Dr. Stephanie Inglis

Investigating Mental Health Support for Military Veterans in Sydney, Nova Scotia
Presenter:    Lisa Marie Hanke (Sociology); Supervisor:  Dr. Terry Gibbs

Abstracts

Evaluating a Pilot Professional Development Course for Masters Coaches
Presenter:    Ciera Disipio (BACS SPAL)
Supervisor:  Dr. Bettina Callary

Masters coaches (MCs) play an important role in Masters athletes’ (MAs; adults over 35) experience in sport. Previous research has explored the needs and expectations of MAs; the perceptions of coaches working with MAs; their sources of learning to coach adults, and the lack of coach education to learn appropriate relational and psychosocial approaches when working with adults (Callary, Rathwell, & Young, 2015, 2017, 2018). The purpose of this project was to evaluate a pilot professional development course for MCs designed from evidence-based research regarding the psychosocial considerations of coaching adults. Thus, a 10-week, 5 module, online professional development course was conducted with five fitness MCs of 10 who were recruited from the same gym. One month after the completion of the course, five MCs who both attended and did not attend the course and three coach developers who designed and implemented the course were interviewed. Findings shed light into the ways that the MCs integrated the learning into their practice, their commitment to online learning, the expectations of the coach developers, and the overall success of the pilot course. This research has implications for future professional development opportunities for MCs.

Keywords: adult professional development; adult learning theory; masters athletes

CK 2 Alpha and Beta crystallization
Presenter:    Yanjun Dong (MBA in CED)
Supervisor:  Dr. David Ruiz-Carrillo

This essay is about crystallization of Casein Kinase 2 in plasmodium falciparum. The protein produced by E. coli. Nickel chromatography, gel-filtration used for protein purification. The crystallization of CK2 holoenzyme will then use for X-ray crystallization. The SDS-Page result shows the beta subunit of CK2 holoenzyme has membrane protein property. Then ReptorX [1] used for predicting the protein structure and software Chimera website Hdock [2] used to combine the structure to holoenzyme. It shows the human CK2 holoenzyme, plasmodium CK2 holoenzyme has similar structure. The PISA [3] result shows the hydrophobic interaction is dominate in binding between each subunit in human CK2 holoenzyme. The Jpred [4] used for secondary structure prediction and Clustal Omega [5] used for sequence alignment. These websites help in identify the alpha helix near the zinc finger domain of beta subunit. The alpha helix suspected as DNA binding site.

Keywords: protein purification; protein crystallization; nickel chromatography

Reflections by CBU Mi’kmaw students on using an indigenous methodology while teaming with non-Indigenous scholars on a speech pathology language research project
Presenters:    Susy Denny & Libby Alex
Supervisor:  Dr. Stephanie Inglis

Two Senior CBU Mi’kmaw university students reflect on their research experiences as co-investigators on  a research project with three Dalhousie speech language pathology graduate students (Fall 2018).  The two research teams, a Mi’kmaw team from CBU and a Speech Language Pathology Graduate team from DAL, co-researched the project entitled Mutual Learning about Speech and Language Development: Conversational between L’nu Speaking Senior Students and Non-L’nu Speech Language Pathology Students.   An Indigenous methodology was used for the data collection.  Talking circles were held and transcribed.  This was followed by thematic analysis of the transcriptions.  This presentation shares Susy Denny’s and Libby Alex’s reflections on their participation in talking circles with non-Indigenous researchers and on the use of standardized western thematic analysis as the methodology for drawing conclusions from the information recorded in the talking circles.

 

Investigating Mental Health Support for Military Veterans in Sydney, Nova Scotia
Presenter:    Lisa Marie Hanke (Sociology)
Supervisor:  Dr. Terry Gibbs

The present research paper investigates what happens to veterans who return home from war traumatized by the violence they have endured and how effective the present mental health infrastructure is in helping them cope/recover. It explores the prevalence of PTSD and depression as well as the lack of support systems for those living with the illnesses in Sydney, Nova Scotia. Available literature has presented the notion that these illnesses go hand in hand, becoming extremely prevalent in war veterans due to heightened exposure to traumatic events. This prevalence, and the lack of impartial research done in the area of military service and mental health have fuelled the present research study. The research question is as follows, “Does the amount of mental health supports in the CBRM meet the needs of military veterans post-service?” Military veterans participated in one on one semi structured interviews covering topics including community, available mental health infrastructure, and successful/unsuccessful organizations. Results indicated that the availability and success of the infrastructure throughout the province is disproportionate; places such as the CBRM seem to be lacking, while the HRM is adequately providing. Stemming from this lack of support, participants felt disconnected from their place of residence and within the veteran community. Organizations that have shown success have been taken off of the map, and replaced with government run organizations, which has led to discouragement. Taken as a whole, results of the present research study indicate that receiving adequate support is a product of mere chance. As stated by the literature, information on mental health infrastructure and developing a deeper understanding of the needs proposed by CAF are essential for efficient service planning, providing access, and creating positive changes in communities. Through completing the present research study, we can begin to fill the gap in research, and available infrastructure.

Keywords: PTSD; military veterans; community support