Student Research Panels I


Join us as we celebrate student research on Tuesday, March 5 at 10am until noon in CS  101.

This event is part of Research Month 2019. Visit our website for a full list of events.

Chair: Dr. Stephanie MacQuarrie

Speakers
Investigating Mental Health Support for Military Veterans in Sydney, Nova Scotia
Presenter:    Lisa Marie Hanke (Sociology); Supervisor:  Dr. Terry Gibbs

Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase (PAL) and Phenylketonuria (PKU)
Presenter:    Vansh Kohli (Chemistry); Supervisor:  Dr. Godwin B. D’Cunha

The History of Hip-Hop in Canada: Saskatoon
Presenter:    Christopher Norman Jeffries Alexander Kuchma (History); Supervisor:  Dr. Lachlan MacKinnon

Masters Coach Development: Implementation and Assessment of a soccer Information-hub in Ibague, Colombia
Presenter:    Catalina Belalcazar (MBA in CED); Supervisor:  Dr. Bettina Callary

Abstracts

Investigating Mental Health Support for Military Veterans in Sydney, Nova Scotia
Presenter:    Lisa Marie Hanke (Sociology)
Supervisor:  Dr. Terry Gibbs

The present research paper investigates what happens to veterans who return home from war traumatized by the violence they have endured and how effective the present mental health infrastructure is in helping them cope/recover. It explores the prevalence of PTSD and depression as well as the lack of support systems for those living with the illnesses in Sydney, Nova Scotia. Available literature has presented the notion that these illnesses go hand in hand, becoming extremely prevalent in war veterans due to heightened exposure to traumatic events. This prevalence, and the lack of impartial research done in the area of military service and mental health have fueled the present research study. The research question is as follows, “Does the amount of mental health supports in the CBRM meet the needs of military veterans post-service?” Military veterans participated in one on one semi structured interviews covering topics including community, available mental health infrastructure, and successful/unsuccessful organizations. Results indicated that the availability and success of the infrastructure throughout the province is disproportionate; places such as the CBRM seem to be lacking, while the HRM is adequately providing. Stemming from this lack of support, participants felt disconnected from their place of residence and within the veteran community. Organizations that have shown success have been taken off of the map, and replaced with government run organizations, which has led to discouragement. Taken as a whole, results of the present research study indicate that receiving adequate support is a product of mere chance. As stated by the literature, information on mental health infrastructure and developing a deeper understanding of the needs proposed by CAF are essential for efficient service planning, providing access, and creating positive changes in communities. Through completing the present research study, we can begin to fill the gap in research, and available infrastructure.

Keywords: PTSD; military veterans; community support

Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase (PAL) and Phenylketonuria (PKU)
Presenter:    Vansh Kohli (Chemistry)
Supervisor:  Dr. Godwin B. D’Cunha

Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a common genetic disorder, especially in infants and children. PKU patients cannot metabolize L-phenylalanine (L-Phe) because they have deficiency/absence of the enzyme Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). PAH transforms L-Phe to L-tyrosine (L-Tyr) in Humans. Since PKU patients are lacking in PAH; L-Phe accumulates in body fluids leading to hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA). HPA is neurotoxic leading to conditions such as intellectual disability, autistic behavior, seizures, tremors and ataxia. One form of treatment of PKU is to place the patient on L-Phe free diet. But, this is not practical because L-Phe, an essential amino acid, is present in almost every protein containing food. One of the major focus of PKU therapy is to use the enzyme Phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) for rapid clearance of L-Phe from body fluids. PAL transforms L-Phe to trans-cinnamic acid and ammonia. Trans-cinnamic acid is easily transformed to hippurate in the human body and excreted via urine. Ammonia is eliminated by the Urea Cycle. Since PAL has to be protected from proteolytic digestion in the human body; it cannot be administered in free form for removing L-Phe. One of the projects in Dr. D’Cunha’s research group at CBU is on the possibility of using Gold nanoparticles coated with PAL as an alternative for removing L-Phe (PKU therapy). I am presenting here the preliminary work I carried out on preparation and characterization of Gold nanoparticles over the spring-summer of 2018.

Keywords: Phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL); Phenylketonuria (PKU); Enzyme therapy

The History of Hip-Hop in Canada: Saskatoon
Presenter:    Christopher Norman Jeffries Alexander Kuchma (History)
Supervisor:  Dr. Lachlan MacKinnon

Hip-hop as an art-form has quickly risen to become one of the most dominant forms of art, expression, and marketing in the twenty-first century. Much research has been conducted in examining the developments of these movements in places such as New York and California, however an extremely limited amount of work has been focused within Canada. With this research, I am attempting to use primary sources as a way of uncovering the past, detailing the history of the culture in individual communities stretching from Halifax to Vancouver. The research pays particular focus on how localized cultural movements arise and evolve in relation to their neighbouring counterparts. The project, to be published as a book for general audiences, as well as an honours thesis, has already amounted to nearly two-hundred interviews and a collection of material documents gathered to be sourced. As I approach my second year of research, I wish to speak on my findings regarding my work within the city of Saskatoon; from the rise of early hip-hop radio, particular booms in culture and relevance, to the state of the culture today. As well as speak the process and hurdles that I have encountered that come with putting together a project of this magnitude.

Keywords: Music; Culture; History

Masters Coach Development: Implementation and Assessment of a soccer Information-hub in Ibague, Colombia
Presenter:    Catalina Belalcazar (MBA in CED)
Supervisor:  Dr. Bettina Callary

Masters Athletes (MAs) are a fast-growing cohort of adults that participate in competitive sport, training regularly in formally registered clubs, events or competitions. Research shows that Masters coaches (MCs) positively contribute to MAs’ sport experiences (Callary, Rathwell, & Young, 2015, 2017). However, research-based resources for MC development are minimal and concentrated to Western countries (Belalcazar & Callary, 2017). In the town of Ibague, Colombia, 280 soccer MAs play in a 21-team league aimed at keeping older adults active in sport and improving wellbeing. Knowledgeable MCs are important to players’ participation and more reliable coach-development resources are needed. The purpose of the research is to implement and assess an information-hub for soccer MCs in Ibague. Semi-structured interviews with MCs will determine their learning needs, then professional development sessions will be set up to develop an information-hub and MCs will be asked to reflect on their experiences. Participatory Action Research methodology will be used to conduct the research and data will be thematically analyzed. The theoretical implications are to explore Jarvis’ (2007) theory of lifelong learning in relation to MCs’ ongoing professional development. Research findings may enable MCs to learn and be more effective in order to drive Masters sport and community development in Ibague, while also expanding this line of research to an international arena.

Keywords: Masters Coach development; Colombian Masters sport; Participatory Action Research