Research in the Context of the Personal, Identity & More

Research in the Context of the Personal, Identity & More

2:30pm – 4:30pm | CE 319

Talks

Cancer and My Income: “Life does not stop – I am still here”: A qualitative study.
Presenter:    Dr. Janet Kuhnke (Nursing)

Balancing Promotion of Designation and Public Trust: Making Disciplinary Information about Professional Accountants Available to the Public in Ontario
Presenters: Dr. Felix Odartey-Wellington(Communication and Languages) + Dr. Leslie Wardley (Organizational Management)

Dyslexia and Identity: A Multiperspective Narrative Inquiry
Presenter:    Sandra Jack-Malik (Education)

The Right to Rural Language
Presenter:    Katie MacLeod (L’nu, Political, and Social Studies)

Abstracts

Cancer and My Income: “Life does not stop – I am still here”: A qualitative study.
Presenter:    Dr. Janet Kuhnke (Nursing)

Patients diagnosed with cancer experience financial distress related to insufficient funds for prescriptions, medical accommodation, travel and basic needs. Patients employed at the time of their diagnosis typically stop working creating the “perfect economic storm”. Twenty patients aged 53-65 receiving care from the Cancer Care Program and referred to social work for financial supports were interviewed. Key themes emerged.

Patients feel injustice and diminished as they live without any income for two – 6 months when the 15-week employment insurance ends and as they try to return to work while ill or access another income program.

Patients navigate the financial abyss with fear and trepidation. They access their “rainy-day” and “secret savings” accounts, dip into retirement savings, maximize credit cards/lines-of-credit and accept family handouts.

Patients feel isolated, shame and disengagement as they quickly prioritize use of monies to include groceries, power, vehicle fuel, rent, mortgages, insurances and vehicle payments. Coffee-out, helping friends, gift for graduations, experiencing Christmas, movies and mini-trips are quickly eliminated. Patients describe, “trying to hang on”, that “I cannot afford to be sick” and “I have a sick husband, mother – without money we cannot live”.  Financial distress is real for patients who experience no income while actively undergoing cancer care. This vulnerable group falls behind economically living in shame and isolation and rarely publically describe their sense of injustice “having cancer is not like having a broken leg”. Participants want to be at work. The participants recommend employment insurance be up to 12 months or as long as they are receiving cancer care.

Balancing Promotion of Designation and Public Trust: Making Disciplinary Information about Professional Accountants Available to the Public in Ontario
Presenters:    Dr. Felix Odartey-Wellington(Communication and Languages); Dr. Leslie Wardley (Organizational Management)

In 2018, Chartered Professional Accountants (CPA) Canada rolled out a slick national corporate advertising campaign to market the CPA designation in Canada as a postmodern “cool” designation for professional accountants. The aforementioned corporate advertising campaign serves as a point of departure for this study. In a media saturated, imagery-driven postmodern culture, this multi-million dollar campaign prosecuted through different media platforms can be rationalized as it serves to position the newly amalgamated association of accountants as representing “Canada’s pre-eminent accounting and business professionals.” This paper is interested in the question of how, apart from communicating its “coolness,” expertise, professionalism and elite status, the accounting profession communicates its accountability regime to build public trust and protect the interests of lay clients.  As governance of the accounting profession evolves in Canada, this paper reviews the publicization regime followed by former Institute of Chartered Accountants of Ontario (ICAO) and now the Chartered Professional Accountants Ontario (CPAO) in relation to the regulation and discipline of its members.  To the extent that the accounting profession in Canada has historically been situated in a self-regulatory environment, there is an expectation that this self-regulation must be in the public interest. Hence, the profession owes its stakeholders including the State, public and clients a duty of transparency. The paper also takes into consideration that the accounting profession plays an important role in the health of the Canadian market economy, especially in services provided to vulnerable Canadians and small businesses. As well, the professional accountant-as-expert is in a position of power vis-à-vis the lay public. This makes it even more important to ensure public awareness about professional accountants who are the subjects of ongoing disciplinary hearings, the particulars thereof, as well as the results of these hearings. Also, the disciplinary process within the accounting profession in Canada is complaints-driven. Lay public agency is enhanced if the workings of this regime are accessible to create awareness. This study revealed that while the publicization regime adhered to by the organization creates opportunities for public awareness, more needs to be done to ensure consistency with the public interest objectives of maintaining public trust, transparency and public awareness.

Keywords: CPA Canada; Professional Governance; Self-Regulation and Discipline; Publicization

Dyslexia and Identity: A Multiperspective Narrative Inquiry
Presenter:    Sandra Jack-Malik (Education)

Arguably literate people have more choices in all areas of their lives. Learning to read is a complex achievement that many children struggle with. What happens when a child’s reading skills do not keep pace with her peers? How does the child understand her struggles to read and how do the parents/guardians understand it. Do these struggles influence other areas of a child’s life? How does regular research based tutoring that results in significant improvements to her reading, writing and spelling influence the child? How do parents/guardians understand the improvements?  This is a longitudinal narrative inquiry that seeks to deepen understandings of the experiences of one child, identified as dyslexic and her family as they struggle to close the academic achievement gaps.  The study also includes a reflexive lens where the researcher regularly considered the tutoring space in efforts to maximize the student’s learning trajectory, while becoming a more effective tutor.

The Right to Rural Language
Presenter:    Katie MacLeod (L’nu, Political, and Social Studies)

Drawing upon ethnographic fieldwork conducted in 2017, this chapter will examine the struggles for language rights and access to French-language education in the rural Acadian community of Pomquet, Nova Scotia. Located approximately 16 kilometers from the town of Antigonish, Pomquet has a population of approximately 900 people and has become increasingly influenced by and dependant upon surrounding English-speaking communities. The community has experienced a large degree of language loss, largely due to a lack of proper support, curriculum, and infrastructure for French-language education over the years. This paper traces the progression of French-language education in Pomquet from the early establishment of grade schools, implementation of a French Immersion program, to the Conseil scolaire acadien provincial building a school in the community in 2001. This discussion will be supported with narratives of how teachers and community members sustained language, social solidarities and collective identities despite experiences of discrimination from neighbouring communities and without provincial or national support prior to the 1980s.

 

This event is part of Research Month 2019. Visit our website for a full list of events.