Examining the Impact of Public Systems & Structures

Wednesday, March 6 – Panel: Examining the Impact of Public Systems & Structures | 10:00am – 11:30am | TBD

This event is part of Research Month 2019. Visit our website for a full list of events.

Speakers

Diversity Initiatives to Recruit and Retain Academic Librarians
Presenter:    K-Lee Fraser, Cape Breton University Library; Co-authors:  Janice Kung (University of Alberta) and Dee Winn (Concordia University)

Thinking through the Revisions to Thinking Government: Politics and Public Administration in Canada, 5th ed.
Presenters:    David Johnson (L.’nu, Political, and Social Studies) and Alana Camp

It’s Lonely at the Top: Relatedness Satisfaction as a Predictor of Leader’s Amotivation over Time
Presenter:    Stephanie Gilbert (Organizational Management)

Abstracts

Diversity Initiatives to Recruit and Retain Academic Librarians
Presenter:    K-Lee Fraser, Cape Breton University Library
Co-authors:  Janice Kung (University of Alberta) and Dee Winn (Concordia University)

Academic libraries take great pride in serving all members of our communities. Libraries across Canada and United States are adopting diversity initiatives to encourage inclusive library environments and services.  However, there is little focus on encouraging diverse service providers in the library.  This presentation will focus on the results of a systematic review conducted to identify the initiatives to recruit and retain academic librarians from diverse backgrounds. Specifically, this study is interested in the following questions: a) what are current and historical practices to recruit diverse librarians into academia?; b) How are university libraries supporting librarians from diverse backgrounds?; and c) What initiatives are in place to encourage librarians to remain in academic librarianship? Findings suggest that there are programs in academic libraries to foster diversity in librarianship. Many programs involve recruiting librarians early in their career, but there are few retention and advancement initiatives for mid-to-late career librarians. The study’s goals are to foster an awareness of the consistent lack of diversity within librarianship and to hold space to discuss ways to solve this ongoing issue.

Keywords: Diversity, Retention, Recruitment

Thinking through the Revisions to Thinking Government: Politics and Public Administration in Canada, 5th ed.
Presenters:    David Johnson (L.’nu, Political, and Social Studies) and Alana Camp

Alana Campbell and I are currently working on fully updating and revising the textbook Thinking Government. This will be the fifth edition of the book and Alana’s name will go on the book as a supplemental author. We will talk about how we have come to this point in the evolution of the book, how we gained the support of the University of Toronto Press editorial board for our planned revisions, and how we are working on updating and improving the book, all the while cutting it down in size by some 15% We will talk about the challenges of textbook writing, seeking to find the balance between the academic interests of professors and the readability and interest concerns of students.

Keywords:  Canadian Politics and Public Administration; Public Sector Management; Public Policy; Leadership; textbook writing; textbook publishing; classroom dynamics;

It’s Lonely at the Top: Relatedness Satisfaction as a Predictor of Leader’s Amotivation over Time
Presenter:    Stephanie Gilbert (Organizational Management)

Much of the organizational leadership literature assumes that leaders want to engage in effective leadership behaviors (Gilbert & Kelloway, 2014), but leaders’ motivation may vary, leading to different levels of performance. To study what motivates leaders to be good leaders, Gilbert and Kelloway (2014) proposed a new construct called motivation for transformational leadership, which integrates transformational leadership theory (Bass, 1985; 1990) and self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985; Ryan & Deci, 2002). This study examined psychological needs satisfaction and frustration as predictors of leaders’ motivation for transformational leadership. Participants were recruited using a market research firm and were assessed via an online survey at three time points, each four months apart, for a final longitudinal matched sample of 111 participants. Cross-lagged panel analyses was conducted using Mplus v. 7.0 examine psychological needs satisfaction and frustration as predictors of motivation for transformational leadership, specifically autonomous and controlled regulation as well as amotivation. The results suggested that relatedness frustration significantly predicted amotivation in subsequent time points, but none of the psychological needs satisfaction or frustration subscales predicted autonomous or controlled regulations longitudinally. The results suggest that when leaders feel isolated, disliked, or excluded from others at work they may become amotivated to be effective leaders as a result. The presentation will elaborate on the details of the analyses and implications of the results for leaders and organizations.