• Pre-1525 – The 7 Mi’kmaw Districts flourished under one government, one language, and one mind
  • 1610 – Chief Membertou and 140 Mi’kmaq are baptized
  • 1620 – Mi’kmaq adopt St. Anne as their patron saint
  • 1621 – King James I gave a piece of land to Sir William Alexander
  • 1713 – There is the same number of Mi’kmaq and Europeans in Nova Scotia
  • 1725 – Peace and Friendship Treaty signed in Boston (Wabanaki Compact)
  • 1726 – Mi’kmaq all agree to Wabanaki Compact
  • 1749 – The Mi’kmaq renew the 1725 Treaty and Halifax becomes the first British settlement in Nova Scotia
  • 1751 – The Mi’kmaq complain to King George about illegal settlement on Mi’kmaq lands
  • 1752 – Mi’kmaq Compact is signed in Halifax
  • 1763 – Royal Proclamation saves all unsold Mi’kmaw lands as hunting grounds, transfers Cape Breton to British
  • 1776 – Mi’kmaq recognize the independence of the new United States in Watertown Treaty
  • 1820 – Some lands protected for Mi’kmaw reserves are established
  • 1834 – Eskasoni reserve established
  • 1867 – British North America Act gives responsibility of treaties and Indians to federal government
  • 1876 – First Indian Act organizes Indian agents
  • 1920 – New Indian Act begins regulating Indians
  • 1930 – Federal government builds boarding school in Shubenacadie
  • 1942 – Federal policy of moving Mi’kmaq to two reserves – Eskasoni and Shubenacadie – begins
  • 1969 – Federal government decides to end Indian status in White Paper Policy and all Indians reject plan and unite. Union of Nova Scotia Indians established
  • 1980 – Eskasoni takes control of their school from federal government
  • 1982 – Canadian Constitution includes Aboriginal and treaty rights
  • 1985 – Supreme Court recognizes Mi’kmaw hunting rights in Treaty of 1752
  • 1990 – Court recognizes Mi’kmaw right to fish
  • 1997 – Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples begins hearings
  • 1999 – Marshall Decision

Mi’kmaw Timeline compiled by Eleanor Bernard and Marie Battiste, 1999.