You know you love music, but perhaps you need a little <strong>help knowing what you want to do</strong> with that passion. Even if you know what you want to do, you may need some help<strong> developing the skills, experiences, </strong>and<strong> networks</strong> that will lead to a <strong>satisfying career</strong> after graduation.

There are numerous opportunities to <strong>develop your resumé</strong> while you’re a student, including a <strong><a href=”http://www.cbu.ca/student-services/jobs-experience/coops/”>co-op option</a></strong> (allowing you to take on full-time paid work while earning university credit), <strong><a href=”http://www.cbu.ca/academic-programs/program/school-of-arts-social-sciences/bachelor-of-arts-community-studies/community-volunteer-work-placements/”>work placements</a></strong> (which can be paid or voluntary work placements that earn you university credit) and <a href=”http://www.cbu.ca/student-services/jobs-experience/job-opportunities/”><strong>student employment</strong></a> (many faculty hire students to work as research assistants), among <a href=”http://www.cbu.ca/student-services/jobs-experience/work-experience-programs/”>other opportunities</a>.

CBU also offers <a href=”http://www.cbu.ca/student-services/jobs-experience/planning-your-career/”>career counselling</a>.

Meet Ceila Cameron, a BACS Music Major, who enrolled in the co-op option and worked for the <a href=”http://celtic-colours.com/”>Celtic Colours International Festival</a>:


<h2>Careers in Music</h2>
Because ethnomusicology is the study of a variety of musics in diverse cultures, it provides insights into the culturally varied way people think and act, <strong>insights that are essential for students living in a diverse, multicultural world</strong>.

Students will develop skills in:
<ul>
<li>designing and undertaking <strong>original research</strong>;</li>
<li><strong>fieldwork</strong> that includes  interviewing and cultural participation;</li>
<li><strong>library and archival research</strong>.</li>
</ul>
<strong>Fieldwork</strong> requires skills in:
<ul>
<li>observation,</li>
<li>reporting,</li>
<li>documenting,</li>
<li>analysing,</li>
<li>multicultural understanding, and</li>
<li>written communication.</li>
</ul>
The <strong>interdisciplinary</strong> basis of ethnomusicology, together with the <strong>transferable skills and knowledge</strong> acquired during its study, make it beneficial for students taking a range of majors, and for students planning any number of careers.

Studies in ethnomusicology may complement or lead to <strong>careers</strong> in:
<ul>
<li>academia</li>
<li>archives and museums</li>
<li>arts administration</li>
<li>broadcasting</li>
<li>education</li>
<li>festivals and the music industry</li>
<li>music management and promotion</li>
<li>libraries</li>
<li>journalism</li>
<li>government</li>
<li>policy making.</li>
</ul>
For <strong>more information about music careers</strong>, visit:

<a href=”https://www.culturalhrc.ca/index-e.php”>The Cultural Human Resources Council</a>: This excellent resource offers cultural career planning materials, charts of competencies required for various careers in culture, and a job board.

<a href=”http://www.artistshousemusic.org/”>Artists House Music</a>: This comprehensive website provides free information, support, guidance, and expert resources to help navigate the challenges and maximize the opportunities available within the music industry.