Student Research

CBU students have the opportunity to do hands on research with the Louisbourg Institute. Below are the bios of past CBU students who chose to take part in the enriching experience of researching with the Fortress of Louisbourg. If you would like more information regarding this unique opportunity please contact Dr. Andrew Parnaby.

Daniel Pitcher

Daniel Pitcher

Daniel Pitcher

Daniel Pitcher has worked at the Fortress of Louisbourg since 1997 where he instructs and performs 18th century French military music. In 2008 he attended CBU as a mature part-time student and graduated with a BA in History (Honours) in 2012. He was the winner of the CW MacDonald Memorial Trophy and will be attending Dalhouse in the fall of 2012 to complete his MA in History. His research pertains to labour construction of Louisburg’s defences, focusing specifically on labour rights of skilled and unskilled labours. He is interested in how labour, military and civilian, was used to build territorial and economic empires in France’s North American colonies.  You can read his thesis here titled “Louisbourg’s Countermine Gallery: Tradition, ‘Progress’, Economic Security, and Imperial Ambitions”.


 

Jenna Currie

Jenna Currie

Jenna Currie

Jenna Currie has worked at the Fortress of Louisbourg for the last twelve years as a Heritage Presenter. In 2008 she decided to go back to university to pursue a Bachelor of Arts in History. Upon completion of this degree at Cape Breton University, she was a recipient of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada’s Joseph-Armand Bombardier CGS Master’s Scholarship, which she is currently using to attain her Master’s degree in History from Saint Mary’s University. Jenna has worked as an archival assistant and researcher at the Beaton Institute, and as a researcher for the Fortress of Louisbourg/Louisbourg Institute. She is currently studying health and medicine in 18th Century Louisbourg.  You can read her undergrad thesis here titled “Outside the Walls: The Habitant Pecheur of Louisbourg’s North Shore”.


 

Heather Green

Heather Green

Heather Green

Heather Green graduated with her Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in History from Cape Breton University in 2011 and is currently an MA Candidate at the Memorial University of Newfoundland studying aboriginal and environmental history of Northern Canada. Heather will be pursuing her doctorate studies at the University of Alberta in September of 2012 studying the environmental and socioeconomic impacts that the industrialization and deindustrialization of Dawson City during the Klondike Gold Rush had on the Tr’ondek Hwech’in First Nation. You can read her thesis here titled “Kluskap’s Cave:

An Aboriginal Cultural Landscape Nomination”


 

Emily MacLeod

Emily MacLeod

Emily MacLeod

Emily MacLeod has worked at the Fortress of Louisbourg off and on since 2005 as puppeteer, tour guide, animator, and research assistant. The work Emily had conducted through her CBU/Parks Canada internship awarded her a funding package to attend Concordia University in Montreal where she is completing a Master’s degree in History. Emily has worked on a variety of public history projects including a podcast tracing legacy of Montreal’s history “Main”. She has also completed a partnership between Concordia University and Parks Canada’s Lachine Canal studying the area’s post-industrial history through the stories of Montreal residents. She will be completing her Master’s research this year which explores the relationship between official history at the Fortress and vernacular commemoration in Louisbourg, Nova Scotia.

You can read Emily’s thesis titled “From Coastal Erosion to ―Cultural Erosion:Louisbourg‘s Siege Against Climate Change” here.