Bruhn, Jodi (May 2009). “In Search of Common Ground:  Reconciling Western-based Governance Principles and First Nations Traditions.” http://iog.ca/sites/iog/files/2009_Traditions.pdf

The present essay appears in a spirit of reconciliation, a term defined most simply as both “to restore friendly relations between” and “to make or show to be compatible.” Taking literally the word’s root in the Latin conciliare, “to bring together,” the paper attempts to begin reconciling two distinct governance traditions at the level of their fundamental principles—without thereby underplaying their deep distinctions. [FN]

“A Circumpolar Inuit Declaration on Resource Development Principles in Inuit Nunaat.” http://inuitcircumpolar.com/section.php?ID=25&Lang=En&Nav=Section

Recognizing the Arctic’s great resource wealth, the increasing global demand for the Arctic’s minerals hydrocarbons and the scope and depth of climate change and other environmental pressures and challenges facing the Arctic. [I]

First Nations – Municipal Community Infrastructure Partnership Program (n.d.) “Guide to Service Agreements.”http://www.fcm.ca/Documents/tools/cipp/CIPP_Toolkit_Unit_3_EN.pdf

Service agreement case studies:  6.1 Gitanmaax First Nation and the Town of Hazelton (BC) pg. 91, 6.2 Muskeg Lake First Nation and the City of Saskatoon (SK) pg. 94, 6.3 Glooscap First Nation and the Town of Hantsport (NS) pg. 98. [FN]

Graham, John , Bruce Amos and Tim Plumptre, (August 2003). “Principles for Good Governance in the 21st Century.” Policy Brief No. 15. http://unpan1.un.org/intradoc/groups/public/documents/UNPAN/UNPAN011842.pdf

This brief will explore the concept of governance and attempt to answer some fundamental questions:  What is governance?  What are the characteristics of good governance?  Who are the players?  Who has influence?  Who decides and in what capacity? [FN]

Graham, John and Jodi Bruhn, (January 27-29, 2009) “Improving Health Governance in First Nations Communities:  Model Governance Policies and Tools.” http://iog.ca/sites/iog/files/2009healthgov_modelpolicies.pdf

This paper provides some background on why policies are needed and the role they might play in the governance of an organization.  Well-crafted and consistently enforced policies are one of many means of advancing good governance.  There are some introductory materials on governance, good governance and the role of the board in good governance as well as on policies as an instrument to promote it.[FN]

Graham, John and Laura Mitchell, (October 6, 2009) “A Legacy of Excellence:  Best Practices Board Study Aboriginal Healing Foundation.” http://www.ahf.ca/downloads/legacy-of-excellence-full-report.pdf

In collaboration with the AHF, the Institute on Governance (IOG) has undertaken a best practices case study of this Board with two goals in mind.  First, identify the key factors that have led the AHF Board to perform at its current high level to inform and inspire other boards, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal, to improve their performance.  Second, this study may offer helpful suggestions for the current AHF Board regarding how its performance may be improved for the remainder of its existence. [FN]

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, (October 2002). “Good Public Works Management in First Nations Communities:  Sharing the Story.” http://publications.gc.ca/collections/Collection/R2-225-2002-1E.pdf

This document presents the delivery of the public works function in six Canadian First Nations communities.  Each of the First Nations has a unique story to tell about how public works are delivered in their community, according to their individual goals, needs, and circumstances. While their situations and histories may differ, there are many common fundamental principles of good public works management shared by the communities. [FN]

National Centre for First Nations Governance (January 2011) “Membertou: Trailblazers in the Atlantic.” Case Studyhttp://fngovernance.org/workshops/case_study/membertou_trailblazers_in_the_atlantic

Membertou’s impressive economic growth and self-sufficiency over the past 15 years has underlined the limitations of the Indian Act in defining citizens and restricting development due to regulations on land use. [FN]

National Centre for First Nations Governance (n.d.) “Governance tool kit Best Practices.”  http://fngovernance.org/resources_docs/TF_Westbank.pdf

NCFNG is a national, independent, First Nations-controlled organization dedicated to supporting First Nations as they work to implement their inherent right to self-governance. The development of a set of shared principles that clearly articulate our approach to effective governance is one way in which we support that work. This NCFNG Effective Governance Case Study profiles a best practice in the principle “Transparency and Fairness”. [FN]

National Centre for First Nations Governance (June 2009) “Governance Best Practices Report.” http://www.newrelationshiptrust.ca/downloads/governance-report.pdf

The Governance Best Practices Report profiles best practices in each of the Governance Centre’s seventeen principles of effective governance.  The practices are drawn from the experience of First Nations across Canada and the U.S.  These reports provide a brief snapshot of strategies, techniques, procedures or processes that produce efficiencies in governance.  They are intended to make concrete the universal principles of effective governance by profiling their implementation in specific First Nations contexts. [FN]

National Centre for First Nations Governance (2010-11) Video “Success Stories.” http://fngovernance.org/stories/#

NCFNG: Law and Policy Tsawwassen First Nation, Miawupkek, Membertou, and Mi’gmaq Nation Listuguj. [FN]

National Centre for First Nations Governance (June 2009) “Governance Best Practices Report.”http://fngovernance.org/publication_docs/NCFNG_Best_Practice_Report.pdf

These reports provide a brief snapshot of strategies, techniques, procedures or processes that produce efficiencies in governance. They are intended to make concrete the universal principles of effective governance by profiling their implementation in specific First Nations contexts. While the reports are intended to serve as models, each community will determine for itself how the principles are brought to life in their specific contexts. [FN]

National Centre for First Nations Governance (March 2012) “Canada: Culture, Tradition, and Governance Videos – Interviews With First Nation Leaders.” http://indigenouspeoplesissues.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=14253:canada-culture-tradition-and-governance-videos-interviews-with-first-nation-leaders&catid=37&Itemid=77

At the heart of restoring effective and efficient governance is revitalizing those parts of a Nation’s governing system that were interrupted by the dysfunctional Indian Act. Incorporating traditional values and practices in modern self-governance efforts is a challenge faced by many First Nations communities across Canada. So how are Nations embracing this opportunity to incorporate their traditions into current and culturally relevant governing systems? The National Centre for First Nations Governance External link interviewed several leaders, youth and elders from across the country to reflect on these questions. [FN]

 

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