Below is a tentative schedule of courses (for both the project, and thesis route) as well as core course and elective descriptions.

Non-Thesis Program Option

Course

Core/Elective

EDUC6101 FUNDAMENTALS OF SUSTAINABILITY  (3 credits)

Core

EDUC6103 EDUCATION FOR SUSTAINABILITY AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP  (3 credits)

Core

CHOICE OF ELECTIVES (3 credits)

Electives

EDUC6105 HEALTH PROMOTING SCHOOLS (3 credits)

Core

EDUC5201 RESEARCH METHODS (3 credits)

Core

CHOICE OF ELECTIVES (3 credits x 2 courses)

Electives

EDUC6104 CURRICULUM INQUIRY: FOUNDATIONS OF THEORY AND PRACTICE (3 credits)

Core

EDUC6800 EDUCATION FOR SUSTAINABILITY, CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION PROJECT (non thesis) (6 credits)

Core

Thesis Program Option

Course

Core/Elective

EDUC6101 FUNDAMENTALS OF SUSTAINABILITY  (3 credits)

Core

EDUC6103 EDUCATION FOR SUSTAINABILITY AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3 credits)

Core

CHOICE OF ELECTIVES (3 credits)

Electives

 EDUC6105 HEALTH PROMOTING SCHOOLS (3 credits)

Core

EDUC5201 RESEARCH METHODS (3 credits)

Core

CHOICE OF ELECTIVES (3 credits)

Electives

EDUC6104 CURRICULUM INQUIRY: FOUNDATIONS OF THEORY AND PRACTICE (3 credits)

Core

EDUC 6901 THESIS proposal stage (3 credits)

EDUC6902 Thesis stage (6 credits)

Core

Core Courses

Fundamentals of Sustainability  (3 credits)

The course will introduce students to an interdisciplinary inquiry into the complexities of sustainable development and sustainability. The course outlines sustainability and sustainable development using a balanced perspective as it is understood through the social sciences (people, cultures, empowerment, education and health), nature and the environment, and prosperity and the economy. The three pillars of sustainability (people, planet, prosperity) will form a core organizational strategy and a systems orientation will allow students to understand the fundamental reasons for unsustainable practices.  Students will inquire into positive local, national and international efforts in economic development, as it is related to social entrepreneurship, in education, in health and in social justice by becoming familiar with the growing body of sustainability scholarship and by identifying future trends that will challenge existing paradigms, yet also open up opportunities for societal change and transformation.

Education for Sustainability and Entrepreneurship (3 credits)

This course is designed to allow students to acquire an in-depth knowledge of the theoretical underpinnings of Education for Sustainability (EfS) and trace its historical and cultural growth through Chapter 36 of Agenda 21 to the Earth Charter and beyond. The course will focus on the EfS competencies, entrepreneurship education, creativity and innovation, providing students with opportunities to build practical, instructional strategies through active inquiry and discovery that enable people to turn ideas into action.

Curriculum Inquiry: Foundations of Theory and Practice (3 credits)

Curriculum Inquiry provides an introduction to curriculum theory as being of central importance to the study of educational experience. This course focuses on the basis of current curriculum theories and their relationship to historical and contemporary educational practices. The course will provide a special focus on the impact of sustainability education and ecological thinking on current educational practice.  A central task of curriculum inquiry is to put forth the broad diversity of curriculum discourses to be explored by educators in the name of good teaching and learning with an understanding that education, both formal and informal, is regarded for its potential for transformative societal change.  The overall aim of this course is to provide the means through curriculum scholarship to become more fully involved in critical inquiries, discussions, and decisions that concern teaching, learning, the social good, and public education.

EDUC 5115  Research Methods (3 credits)*

This course is designed to introduce students in CBU’s Graduate programmes to the essential elements which underpin the planning, implementation, analysis, evaluation and reporting of educational research. Students will also become familiar with CBU’s application policy and procedures for research involving humans, as well as the Tri-Council standards for research ethics.

Health Promoting Schools (3 credits)

This course builds on the World Health Organization definition of a Health Promoting School (HPS). “A health promoting school is one that constantly strengthens its capacity as a healthy setting for living, learning and working.” Students will be introduced to the rationale and evidence for HPS as well as the fundamental components and processes behind becoming a HPS. In addition to HPS, frameworks such as Comprehensive School Health will also be examined and discussed with respect to the relevance for sustainability education, policy and practice.

Education for Sustainability, Creativity and Innovation Project (6 credits)

This project-based course provides the opportunity for students to integrate sustainability education into a project at their organization. Students will assess the current strengths and areas for development regarding sustainability education in their school. Based on the assessment, students will design and implement, evaluate, and report on a project that is completed within the timeframe of the course.

Students choosing the major project will apply course knowledge and skills to the development of a practical project. The student’s supervisor must approve the subject and outcomes of the project. Specific requirements will be arrived at in consultation with the student, the supervisor, and the Department. The requirements for the project will be clearly delineated to avoid disputes later. The project should demonstrate that the student is able to apply knowledge and skills to develop and implement a real world project with identifiable outcomes.

NOTE: Similar to the process used in our counseling diploma, students who choose the project route will be required to submit a signed letter from their principal/ organizational supervisor who will confirm their support for the implementation of the project and willingness to provide a minor supervisory role.

Sustainability, Creativity and Innovation Thesis (9 credits)

The thesis will be undertaken with the supervision of a faculty supervisor chosen by the student from amongst the ranks of faculty who have been vetted by the Office of Research and Graduate Studies. The thesis will involve the development of a thesis proposal that is approved by the student’s supervisor and the CBU Research Ethics Board. The thesis is expected to be 60-80 pages (double-spaced) in length and adhere to the approved standards of the Office of Research and Graduate Studies. All theses will be examined by an external reader selected by the student’s supervisor, and also through an oral defense to be attended by the student (virtually or in person), and a thesis defense committee [consisting of the thesis supervisor, at least one MEd (SCI) programme faculty member as well as the external reader]. Successful completion of the thesis will contribute 9 credits toward the MEd (SCI); once the research proposal is approved, the thesis will typically be completed within 6 – 12 months.

Elective Courses

Indigenous and Global Perspectives on SCI (3 credits)

Formal and non-formal education initiatives have embraced Education for Sustainability (EfS) throughout the world with practical accomplishments – modeling processes and practices that are transforming communities, schools and education. Students will explore Indigenous worldviews and global perspectives on EfS, entrepreneurship, and Living Schools with potential applications to their educational setting.

Nature and Outdoor Learning (3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the historical, cultural and philosophical development of the concept of nature and the evolving human relationship with the natural world in Western thought since the advent of a Cartesian worldview. The course will trace the bifurcation of human experience from the natural world and the ramifications of the dominance of Cartesian dualism for both people and the environment. Students will be challenged to connect the evolution of the concept of nature with our current shift to educating for sustainability. The course will explore the relationship of children and young people with nature and inquire into models of outdoor learning. Students will engage with their local places and integrate the theories and practices of outdoor learning in ways relevant to cultural and local contexts.

Sustainability, Happiness and Wellbeing (3 credits)

This course will examine the nexus of sustainability, happiness and wellbeing with respect to education. Students will explore the relationship between individual, community and global wellbeing and the relevance for educators, both personally and professionally. In addition to relevant research, students will also become familiar with educational resources for sustainability education, social and emotional wellbeing, and sustainable happiness .

Transformative Education: Teaching for Creativity (3 credits)

A foundational component of competencies for educators in EfS is the capacity to achieve transformation (people, pedagogy, and education systems).  This involves developing the understanding of why transformation is needed and how to facilitate these transformations through the study of the creative process and the acquisition of the requisite skills to imagine and co-create sustainable futures.

The MEd (SCI) is designed to be a transformative programme and this course will establish a learning community that supports students to develop their own skills and practices in teaching for creativity and innovation as transformative educators, learners, and leaders. It is anticipated that ongoing support will be established through an internet platform that enables students to share resources and experiences.

Ecotexts : Sustainability and the Cultural Imagination (3 credits)

This course will introduce students to the field of ecologically oriented cultural studies, or ‘eco-criticism’. It will critically examine various cultural constructions of sustainability in a range of texts exemplifying different discourses (e.g. fictional, philosophical, scientific) and genres (e.g. film, documentary, narrative, poetry). In addition, consideration will be given to the emergence of a number of distinct approaches within eco-critical studies, such as critical eco-feminism, eco-phenomenology, eco-psychology and environmental justice. The prefix “eco” is interpreted inclusively to reflect environmental, societal, economic issues and the inherent interrelationships that exist.

Digital Citizenship in a Global Community (3 credits)

Digital citizenship can be defined as the norms of appropriate and responsible behaviour online. Within this course we will examine digital citizenship from two major perspectives: responsible use in the K-12 environment and the world beyond schools. Within each perspective we will review policy and practice, rights and responsibilities, safety and security, as well as health and wellness. Some specific themes include cyberbullying, digital etiquette, access, copyright, borderless classrooms, the digital divide and civic engagement.